WWF Adopt a Leopard

Adopt a Leopard

WWF Adopt an Animal

from £3.00 a month

  • Order by 19th December for Christmas DeliveryGift pack includes a cuddly leopard toy, factbook, bookmarks, stickers, personalised certificate and photo of your leopard!
  • Receive regular updates with WWF’s “Wild World” and “My Leopard” magazines.
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Standard Delivery

Christmas UK Delivery

Hurry for FREE Standard Delivery!
Order by 1.30pm on Tuesday 19th December 2017 to receive gift pack in time for Christmas.

FREE Delivery

Express Delivery

If you order by 1.30pm on Wednesday 20th December 2017 your gift pack should be dispatched on the same day and arrive the day after. Express delivery costs £7.50.

Last Minute Gift

Last Minute Gift?

Left it til the last minute again? No problem! WWF offer a gift certificate to print or email so you have something to give on the big day. Your standard gift pack will then be received within 10 days of purchase.

WWF Registered Charity Number: 1081247

Adopt a Leopard

Adopt a Leopard

Their Existence is Under Threat

There are only 70 Amur Leopard’s left on the planet, making them one of the world’s most endangered big cats. Currently residing in the forested province of Primorskii Krai in Eastern Russia, the Amur Leopard has longer legs than regular leopards through having to feed in the snow, and are skillful hunters who prey on deer, badgers and wild boar.

Your donations will help WWF to restore their areas of forest, ensure increased fines for poaching and illegal trade of leopards, and train local firefighters to reduce the impact of forest fires. With your help WWF can halt the Amur Leopard’s slide into extinction.

Adopt a Leopard Cuddly Toy

Adopt a Leopard Gift Pack with Cuddly Toy

Looking for something different this Christmas? When you adopt a leopard with WWF the recipient will get a soft toy leopard to cuddle up with. Lovely stuff!

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Leopard Facts

5 Leopard Facts

  1. Pound for pound the leopard is the strongest of all the big cats. They have the ability to climb trees even whilst carrying heavy prey.
  2. Leopards are extremely agile. They have the ability to jump 3 metres vertically and 6 metres horizontally. They are excellent swimmers and when they run, can reach a top speed of 58 Kmph.
  3. The leopard tends to prefer living alone with male territories overlapping those of females. Leopards only ever tolerate intrusion into their territory for mating purposes.
  4. There are nine subspecies of leopards and all with the exception of the African leopard can be found in Asia, South Asia and India.
  5. Leopards are nocturnal animals and prefer to spend the day resting either in thick bushes or up in trees.

Why Adopt a Leopard

The Amur leopard is one of the rarest species on the planet. It is estimated that there are less than 70 of these magnificent big cats left in the wild. Their traditional habitat spans the South-East of Russia and North-Eastern China. The Amur leopard differs from other subspecies of leopards because they have the strongest spotted fur. In 2007 the number of Amur leopards in the wild fell to as low as between 15 to 20. In the decade since then through conservation efforts, their numbers have been steadily increasing. If that is not enough to convince you to help keep the Amur leopard protected here are five more reasons why you should adopt one.

1. Help WWF Stop The Illegal Trade In Amur Leopard Body Parts

Traditional Eastern medicine makes extensive use of wild animal body parts in the treatment of many diseases. These treatments have no scientific basis, so it is a real tragedy when poachers track and kill an animal as endangered as the Amur leopard in order to satisfy demand for body parts that in actual fact have no real value. Help WWF stop the senseless killing of this beautiful big cat by adopting an Amur leopard.

2. Make Sure The Amur Leopard is Around For Future Generations

With so few Amur leopards left in the wild, we are in real danger of seeing this species disappear altogether. Unless there is a concerted effort by conservation agencies, partnering with governments to do something about this, the Amur leopard will probably become extinct. We need to stop this from happening and you can help by adopting an Amur leopard through WWF.

3. Help End Habitat Destruction

One of the reasons why there are so few Amur leopards is because humans have been encroaching on their natural habitat. Forests have been converted into agricultural land and people have been engaging in illegal logging. If we are to see a real revival of this species, all of this needs to end. To do that WWF needs to lobby local authorities and national governments to protect the areas Amur Leopards roam. You can help fund the effort by adopting an Amur Leopard through WWF.

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4. Help Restore The Amur Leopard’s Natural Prey

Loss of habitat also means loss of prey. Amur leopards have to face harsh winters and often there is simply not enough food to sustain the prey these leopards hunt. WWF is doing something about this by supplementing the food prey species feed on and also vaccinating them against disease. WWF works with wildlife managers to make sure that there are healthy populations of ungulates that can sustain a growing population of leopards in the region. You can help them achieve this goal by adopting an Amur leopard.

5. An Amur leopard Adoption Is A Great Gift Idea

People love tigers and elephants, and we’re not saying it’s not important to help protect those species. However, with just a handful of Amur leopards left in the wild, the species could literally disappear tomorrow. By gifting friends or family an Amur leopard adoption through WWF, they will receive a gift pack and other goodies and they will know that they are helping keep one of the most endangered species on the planet safe.

Adopt a Leopard

WWF

About WWF Adoptions

For a small regular monthly fee you can Adopt an Animal with WWF for yourself or a friend which will help to safeguard the future of your selected species and their habitat. Animal adoptions make great charity gifts and are also an excellent way to show your support to the worlds wildlife and help to fund the work WWF does on conservation. You can also support their great work with a WWF Membership or by choosing from one of their selection of charity gifts at the WWF Shop.

WWF Charity Information

WWF are the worlds largest independent environmental organisation. Originating in the UK where they were formed in 1961 they are now active all over the world. As a charity the WWF rely heavily on donations from members and supporters.

WWF Facts

  • a truly global network who are active in over than 100 countries
  • a science-based organisation who tackle issues including the survival of species and habitats, climate change, sustainable business and environmental education
  • over five million supporters worldwide
  • 90 per cent of their income comes from donations from people and the business community

WWF’s Mission

WWF are on a mission to stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment. They want to build a future in which we can live in harmony with nature. It’s a simple mission statement but difficult to achieve. They aim to use their practical experience and knowledge to find and implement longterm solutions. They have set out some clear pointers to help achieve their goal.

  • Conserve the world’s biological diversity.
  • Campaign for the use of renewable and sustainable resources.
  • Reduce pollution and wasteful consumption.

Latest News

Habitat Destruction Bringing Leopards Into Conflict With Humans

Recently a leopard wandered into school building in the Indian state of Assam and ended up mauling four people.  Forest officials think that the leopard was simply seeking somewhere to rest for the night before going hunting for prey. Workers doing some construction work entered the school in the morning and four of them were attacked ending up in hospital with everyone surviving.

President Trump’s Border Wall Will Mean The Extinction Of Jaguars In The United States

Wildlife experts and biologists believe that one-day jaguars could make a return to the United States if the country leaves a trail open for females to follow males that have been spotted in the country. There have been seven confirmed male jaguars spotted in the US since 1996. Five of those males ventured into Southern Arizona and two were seen in South-Western New Mexico. Jaguars have effectively been extinct in both places for decades.

Diver Saves Sea Turtle From Choking On Plastic Bag

A diver rescued a sea turtle from certain death after the turtle swallowed a plastic bag that ended up becoming lodged eight inches down the adult female’s throat. Saeed Rashid a lecturer at Bournemouth University was diving in the Red Sea when he came across a couple of Hawksbill turtles that were feeding on jellyfish. After snapping a number of pictures Mr Rashid realised that the female turtle was experiencing some distress and could not feed because the plastic bag was blocking her airway.

Meet The Man Trying To Save The Jaguar

Ricardo Moreno is a cat loving conservationist who has focused his efforts on protecting South America’s biggest cat, the jaguar. The jaguar used to roam across a territory that spanned nearly nine million square kilometres. Its range extended from the Southern mountains of Argentina all the way up to the Grand Canyon in the United States. Unfortunately, after decades of hunting and habitat destruction, the jaguar’s range has dramatically shrunk and in the process its population has fallen by a whopping 40 per cent.